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July 09, 2007

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There's also BarCamp (http://barcamp.org), which was formed in response to Foo Camp, and is named for the next variable after "foo" in the metasyntactic sequence. (foo, bar, baz, quux ...)

When the great break-through punk band Nirvana died along with its singer-guitarist Kurt Cobain, there was one positive side effect: drummer Dave Grohl stepped out from behind the drum kit to play guitar, sing, and lead one of the best bands of the past ten years (oops, 1st LP was in '95!): The Foo Fighters. Oh, wait, excuse me, like Rolling Stones and Eagles, I believe they have dropped the article: just Foo Fighters, thank you.

Foo Fighter was the name given to UFOs during WWII.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foo_fighter

Do you suppose people looking for info on the Wii game controllor ever stumble across WWII articles?

See, to paraphrase Gertrude Stein, there's no The there:
http://rollingstones.com/home.php
http://eaglesband.com

Which reminds me, have you heard the radio ads for the Mastercard Card? Is there an echo in here here?

To follow up on Erin's comment, "bar" follows "foo" in the sequence as an homage to "fubar," the WWII (not Wii!) acronym meaning "Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition." (Intentional use of euphemism; I'm trying to maintain my G rating.)

Foo is widely used in programming as a variable name, in exactly the sense you use it here - as a placeholder. Also, I've seen editors used TK in text as a placeholder. For example "The Porsche 911, capable of a top speed of TK mph, costs $TK." It's a good way to keep writing when you don't have the facts to hand and you don't want to stop and look them up.

Matthew: Thanks for the comment! "TK" comes from journalism, where it's an abbreviation for "to come"--as in "headline to come." Why not "TC," you ask? Because in the pre-computer era, copy editors couldn't risk having their handwriting misinterpreted. A "K" is less likely to be ambiguous than a hastily scrawled "C."

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