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February 20, 2013

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If you changed it to Mycestra, I think you'd have a great name for an antidepressant or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. You're welcome, Big Pharma.

Hmm, Mousetro.com is available. At least it doesn't have the plural. Could be pronounced "mouse-set-tro", though. Mystro.com is taken, and looks like Mystery, anyway. Micetro.com is taken, but not in apparent use yet, and looks like my-set-row. Moustro.com is for sale, but looks like a French restaurant, pronounced "Moose-tro". Myctro.com is parked, maybe for sale, but it's icky. Yeah, I think this one's just unsolvable. "Mouse" is now a fading technology, anyway, so he should let go of that part, and go all in with the conductor image. And give up on using the word Maestro, too - for Americans, that's just too odd a spelling to make a pun out of. How does this silly language reconcile Maestro and Aegis, anyway? The only solid American brand with an "ae" is Aerosmith.

Mark: I checked out Mousetro, too. I think it's a reasonable replacement, and I don't think the pronunciation would be a problem.

Here's what the problem is: The inventor wants us to associate the new product with a familiar category, but I'd like to see a radical redefinition. The mouse got its name from the tail-like cord; with wireless technology, we no longer have that association. A real name-development exercise would explore new associations brought to mind by the device.

Saw a portmanteau and thought of you:

https://orgreenic.com/

Very interesting example. In a global market, the English-as-a-second-language point of view should not be underestimated, but apparently the creators of Mycestro never took it into account. Also the majority of non native speakers would parse the name as My-cestro, find it difficulto to pronounce and wonder what on earth a cestro might be (to Italians it looks like a misspelling of cesto, “basket”). Very few would associate Mycestro with maestro.

Reminds me of misty pings!

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