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June 26, 2012

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Along the Black Sea, anyway, "değil" (which means "not," somewhat in the "Wayne's World" sense) is pronounced like a slightly-drawled "dale".

I had less trouble with ğ than I did with the dotted vs. undotted i.

I don't see a difficulty in pronunciation, any more than there's a difficulty pronouncing the phrase "my leg hurts". No glottal stop there. You might get the /h/ realised as [χʷ] sometimes, but that is not a problem.

(Incidentally, I disagree with Lynne about the hypothesised spelling/pronunciation link, but that was covered adequetly in the comments there.)

It's "yewg" to me. See an umlaut, pronounce it, I always say.

>(It starts to sound like “yoga-hund.”)

Epenthesis! :-)

>I don’t have a dog, so I can’t give you a report about the product itself

When contemplating the likely response of a dog to this product, it might be helpful to remember that dogs are, at heart, scavengers. We have a running inventory of Things Our Dogs Won't Eat, and it runs to approximately 3 items: lettuce; raw onions (said to be bad for them anyway); sour cherries. They'll give anything else a go.

As for "lactose intolerance," Harold McGee (of cooking and kitchen fame) notes that the ability to digest milk as adults is actually limited, certainly among humans, to a relatively small percentage of people who are of Northern European extraction. "Lactose intolerance" is in fact the norm among adult humans, and probably works in a similar way among many other adult mammals after weaning. He notes also that people can tolerate larger quantities of milk-based products if those products are, in effect, pre-digested, i.e., the lactase has been broken down by bacteria. Indeed, that's what happens in cheese and, yes, yog(h)urt.

Ok! Probably more than you really wanted to hear. :-)

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