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April 18, 2008

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I scored 28 but can't do any better than that unless I pay closer attention to my wrong answers. Typeface namers often do a great job at capturing some essence of the font in a way that resonates. Or so it seems. I could be completely wrong.

Only one font from the entire list in Windows can be used for kids ABC workbooks. What is it?

I'll admit to being a big fan of arial. That's because it's very clear and easy to read. When you put a script in front of a voiceover, my contention is that they'll make fewer mistakes reading arial than any other typeface.

Try printing in a selection of typefaces and then faxing the results over a bad line. Again I contend that if you want to maximise the chance of it being readable, use arial.

If your belief is that 'form should follow function', then it can only be arial.

The only time when, arguably, this does not apply is when teaching children to read. In this case a typeface with a round 'a' (without the curly top) is preferred by teachers.

Last: is it only me that pronounces Arial with a hard 'A'? Every designer seems to call it 'aerial'. But then, as I've said before, to spell seems to be not very high up in the required skills of graphic designers.

Century Gothic is the only Windows font with the round 'a'with a straight back and a lower case 't' and 'f' that manage to end without a tail.
By the way , I dropped in at the local pub on my way home. I started thinking about this blog and fonts. Suddenly, the labels on the bottles behind the bar came into focus. Almost every bottle seemed to have its own distintive personality. What a collection of fonts, type settings and graphics! From now on I'll be looking at those bottles with "new eyes". ( sorry if this topic has been mentioned before!)

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